[members-announce] Eddie Shedosky, Grover Mitchell, Marian McPartland, Rex Stewart, Terry/Brookmeyer

Paul Baker paulb at webitects.com
Wed Oct 8 11:09:08 EDT 2003


OCTOBER ON THE JAZZ INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO WEBSITE

Come to http://www.jazzinstituteofchicago.org 
to read the stories below.
(If you don't see a link, type the above address into your browser.)

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The Bachelors and Benedicks Ball-
or how I witnessed an Eddie Shedosky caper
and lived to tell about it 

"If one were to gather a cadre of jobbing musicians together from the
'golden' years of jobbing, and if a few beers or some good wine was on
hand to stimulate the little gray cells that handle reminiscence, sooner
or later tales about Eddie Shedosky would surface."
-by Joe Levinson

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Grover Mitchell Remembered

"Fifty years ago Grover and I were young trombonists in the Department
of Pacific Marine Corps Band stationed on Treasure Island, a Navy base
off of San Francisco. The Korean war was on and we were several years
out of high school."
-by Jim Beebe

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Marian McPartland

"Although she is one of a handful of British pianists who have made
successful careers in the United States, Marian McPartland remains
unique. Her flawless technical ability, sense of rhythm and tasteful way
of improvising would be enough on their own to make claim to her
extraordinary place in jazz. But Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz Hour has
established her as an important historian, who has drawn forth and
placed on record a large body of jazz history which would otherwise be
undocumented."
-interviewed by Steve Voce

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Most Valued Player: Rex Stewart

"One of the many virtues of Duke Ellington's band in the decade 1935-45
was the strength and diversity of musical characters that passed through
its ranks. No reed section that contained both Johnny Hodges and Ben
Webster could want for distinctive soloists, and the same is true of any
trumpet section that contained both Cootie Williams and Rex Stewart."
-by Nic Jones

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Classic Recordings:
Clark Terry/Bob Brookmeyer

"The importance of the 'New Thing' and the work of certain key musicians
of the 1960s has effectively conspired to wipe the ledger clean of any
references to what might be considered the 'old thing' verities of the
Clark Terry-Bob Brookmeyer Quintet. Yet the group managed to achieve an
enthusiastic following in the early to mid-1960s, despite the more
fashionable and widely reported events occurring elsewhere in jazz.
Indeed, they were even flown across the Atlantic to guest on the BBC
television series Jazz 625, 'An event unheard of, outside This Is Your
Life,' appositely quipped presenter Humphrey Lyttelton."
-by Stuart Nicholson

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FROM RECENT ISSUES

Bronzeville conversation with Lewis Ogletree

". . .working for Earl Hines was good but I looked out at the dancers as
we played and saw some 3,000 or more people who had paid at least $10
each to come to see us. I knew I needed to make a change. I was only
making $65 per night with Earl. Also, if we didn't work for three or
four days in a week, I'd have to ask for an advance on next week's
salary just to make it."
-by Charles Walton

----------------------------------------
Myself Among Others: A Life In Music and
Blue Note: A Biography

"Apart from the musicians themselves, there is an honor roll of jazz
heroes we might call, for want of a better word, the great
presenters-certain club owners, concert promoters, independent-label
owners, record producers, personal managers, impresarios and so
forth-whose contributions were so vast they literally helped shape the
music during the last century."
-reviewed by Don Rose

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Classic Mahavishnu Orchestra

"Since February 1969 McLaughlin had been a regular on Miles Davis
recording sessions and an occasional participant on live dates, such as
the Hill Auditorium date at Ann Arbor in February 1970 and the dates in
December that year that appeared as a part of Live-Evil (Columbia/Legacy
C2K 65135). It was while playing with Davis at the latter date that the
trumpeter encouraged McLaughlin to form his own band. McLaughlin gave
the notion serious thought and decided to go ahead with the help of
Davis's then manager, Nat Weiss"-by Stuart Nicholson

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Bill Perkins

Bill Perkins, who passed away this August, was "one of the outstanding
members of the legion of technically gifted and musically inspired tenor
players who emerged at the beginning of the fifties."-an interview with
Steve Voce from our archives.

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News & Views 
by Charles Walton
will return next month
 
 
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Come to http://www.jazzinstituteofchicago.org 
to read these stories.
(If you don't see a link, type or copy the above address into your
browser.)

We're always looking for good jazz-related articles. 
Send us an email if you'd like to write something.

Paul Baker, Editor
paulb at webitects.com



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