Eddie Harris
TED PANKEN'S CHICAGO TRANSCRIPTS

Eddie Harris
June 29, 1994, WKCR-FM New York

copyright © 1994, 1999 Ted Panken

[Music: "Freedom Jazz Dance" (1964)]

Q: "Freedom Jazz Dance" -- maybe I'm wrong -- became famous after Miles Davis reworked it for his own uses and recorded it. How did Miles get hold of the tune?

EH: Ron Carter came over to him. He came by and offered Ron more money while I was working at the Five Spot for a month. And I said, "Ron, you should take it. It's more money." And he took the tune over there, because we were playing it at the Five-Spot, and the rest is history. Miles recorded it, and all of a sudden I was hip. [Chuckles]

Q: So it was a working band that recorded your first Atlantic dates.

EH: Yes.

Q: You go and Cedar Walton go back to an Army band from the 1950s.

EH: Yes. Cedar and I were outside of Stuttgart, at Vahingen(?), and we had a Jazz band out of the orchestra that had formed. It was quite a jazz band. Leo Wright was head of the jazz band, people like Lanny Morgan, Don Menza was in the band . . . It was a very good band.

Q: Was this a band that was set up for the recording, or had you been working?

EH: No. These days it's very seldom that you get quintets, quartets, sextets, octets as working bands. You generally get duos or trios as working bands. That's where the business has gone. So I came in and recorded with this trio, and they had been working together. That made it easier for me.

Q: Were your originals composed for the date?

EH: I wrote two tunes for the date. Other than that, there's a situation going on in Japan where they have some kind of deals with standard tunes in which they want you to play standard tunes. So I don't mind. As long as they raise the ante financially, I'll play all the standards they want.

[Music: There Was A Time: Echoes of Harlem, "Lover Come Back To Me"]

Q: I'd like to talk to you about your background in Chicago, Illinois, where you spent a good chunk of your life and developed as a musician. Your beginnings in the music are what? On piano? Saxophone?

EH: I started on piano first. Then I was singing.

Q: Where? In the church? Home?

EH: Yeah, in the church. The church. I mean, they used to stand me up on a table, because I could sing right in tune, in time, and I was only like five years old. But when I was four, my cousin was teaching me piano. She played for the church.

Q: What church was it?

EH: Shiloh Baptist Church. Later on, I was singing at Ebeneezer Baptist Church.

Q: Which I think was the largest church on the South Side . . .

EH: Well, they were very large churches. And my mother was a big wig there at that church, until she died; and she lived until 1991, and she was 91 when she passed on.

Q: Were your parents born in Chicago or did they come there?

EH: My mother was from down south in New Orleans, and my father was from Cuba.

Q: And when did they come to Chicago?

EH: I don't know. They met in Chicago. I imagine they came in the teens, or maybe . . . I think they came in like 1913. He worked in the stockyards, and my mother worked in the laundry. And they weren't particular about me playing music. Of course, my father didn't really care. He died when I was a young guy.

Q: So your mother raised you.

EH: Yeah, my mother. I really took care of my mother and three aunts.

Q: How did the music develop for you? You obviously had an immediate facility for it.

EH: Well, really, Ted, I wanted to play sports. I was quite a sports advocate.

Q: All sports?

EH: All sports. And I could really play -- football, basketball, baseball. To be honestly frank with you, because I was taught at such a young age, as I got older I didn't particularly care for a lot of the people that played music. Because a lot of musicians were, like, too timid: "Oh, I hurt my hands, I can't do this . . . " I ran with the gangs, and used to even box at Nichols' Gym, and I didn't think about my hands or my embrochure or mouth. Musicians, I couldn't really take 'em. I didn't dig it.

Q: When did you start finding people you could relate to on a musical level?

EH: Well, after I got up in the teens. When you get in the teens, you start meeting guys, like the late Charles Stepney . . . There became a group of us. Muhal Richard Abrams, Raphael Garrett, James Slaughter, Walter Perkins, Bill Lee. There was a small group of us who were on the same wavelength in trying things. And that was interesting to me, to try things, not just sit down and play an Ellis Larkins run or a Duke Ellington run -- which could easily be done, because we'd deal with music all day. But these guys, we all wanted to try some different things. You see, most guys didn't want to try different things. They just wanted to sound like whoever was happening at the time. Now, as young guys, we were listening to the guys that were coming off the JATP, the Jazz At the Philharmonic, which was Charlie Parker and Bud Powell and that group of guys, who was a little older than we were, that was playing some strange type music!

Q: So when did music become a thing that you were doing all day? Because you can't be playing sports all day and be playing music all day?

EH: Why not?

Q: Well, maybe you can.

EH: [Laughs] When I say playing sports all day . . . What do you do as a young guy? In those days you had clubs on every corner. I mean, you could play somewhere in the evenings. So then you could rehearse, and when you're not playing with guys, you can play ball. See, it's not like it is today, where most young guys are trying to lobby for a recording. Well, all we wanted to do was play! Heh-heh. That was a vast difference.

Q: When you were coming up in Chicago, there was also a community of older musicians on a world-class level. Who were some of the people who really impressed you and that you modeled yourself after?

EH: Well, I was quite a pool shooter. I would go into different cities on a bus, go in and collect up some money until they'd get hip to me. And I found, from going over to Detroit, down to St. Louis, over to Cleveland, that Chicago (you don't realize it when you're coming up in an environment) had more individualism than anywhere else. Anywhere else. See, in other cities you had great musicians, but the group of guys, they generally played in one vernacular. Whatever that city held, it was like that group of guys produced that type of music.

In Chicago, you could go from one club, and you could hear a Gene Ammons, you had Budd Johnson, and you had Tom Archia, Dick Davis -- just dealing with saxophone. Then you had all sorts of piano players that were really. . .really different. You'd go to one club, and the guy sounds like he totally comes from somewhere else. He didn't sound like a little different from the guy down the street. It was totally different.

You can imagine a guy coming up from Birmingham, like Sun Ra, playing there. People said, "Hey, they got Monk in New York." We said, "Yeah, but wait until you come to Chicago and hear Sun Ra!" You know what I mean? Chicago had everybody coming . . . They said, "There's a guy who can really play drums, man, Max Roach, man -- he's bad!" "Yeah. Wait til you hear Ike Day." "This guy can play all kind of bass man, this guy is terrific playing bass, Raymond Brown." And I said, "Wait til you hear Wilbur Ware." See, we had guys like that in Chicago. Like you're finally hearing Von Freeman, which was outside years ago. And people said, "John Coltrane." We said, "Well, you should hear Von Freeman." That's the way I thought coming up.

Q: What do you think it is about Chicago that produced that type of individualism? Is it just an accident that all these people were there, or is it something about the culture of the city?

EH: I think it's the latter. Because people came up primarily from the middle south; that's Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. The train came, and Chicago was the train center, so they'd get off there. You had the stockyards and people could get work, primarily the African-American people of that time.

And the people in general were just regular people. In other words, that's why it was considered the blues capital. They were regular people there. In other words, when you were playing on the stand, guys would just come up and tell you: "Hey, man, I really liked that. I didn't know what that was, but it's all right." If you're playing something else, a guy says, "Hey, I don't like that, man. Why don't you stop playing that."

See, they were just straight out. They weren't like the West Coast or the East Coast. On the East Coast they said, "Let me analyze what this guy is doing." The guy maybe had just been playing two years, but they're trying to analyze something -- the guy's trying to put something over on them. The West Coast is just write it out, have it all organized. In the Midwest they said, "Hey, man, I spent my money. Come on, play something for me. That's nice, you experimented now . . . " It's like I'd play with no neck on the horn. "Okay, enough of that. Let me feel something." And will go upside your head if you didn't!

So therefore, guys that come out of this particular area were more rounded out musicians. Because you would experiment, then you would stop and learn a song in its entirety, knowing the correct melody or the lyrics. Because other than that, you might wind up getting beat up or have to fight some people.

Q: In Chicago at that time almost every major cross-street had several different clubs, and some, like 63rd Street, were almost wall-to-wall with clubs.

EH: Well, this was true in other cities. It was true in Philly, it was true in Detroit. But the only thing I can be repetitive on, Ted, is to say they had different sounding groups in different venues. That was the shocking part about it. And when you come up in that environment, you don't realize it until you go elsewhere. You'd walk out of one club, and you just heard the blues, jumpin' up and down, then go down the street, there's a swinging jazz group, then go down the street to the next club and say, "What is that?" It's just like you went to another space or another time. Which I didn't see in other cities.

Q: You also experienced the very intense teaching methods of Walter Dyett at DuSable High School. Can you say a few words about him, and the DuSable situation?

EH: Well, it was a time in which it was segregated times, and therefore African-Americans primarily only were able to go to, like, five schools. And you could imagine that many people in one area . . . Before they had (what is it called?) the high rises or these lower-income homes, they had kitchenettes. That's a big apartment with one family in the front, one family in the middle apartment, and another family in the rear apartment. So you were like crammed.

Dyett was an instructor at DuSable High School. He had been a captain in the service. And he had to be rough. Because the guys who came to that school were extremely rough. In other words, say you hit that part wrong. Some guys would just tell you, "So what? Go on and play the music." And he didn't tolerate that. He would either go upside your head, have you bring your parents up to school. I remember one time I fell asleep. He kicked the chair out from under me, and I got up off the floor with my clarinet all sprawled everywhere! It was really strange.

John Gilmore was in class with me, Pat Patrick -- the whole Sun Ra band, as a matter of fact. He had moved into the neighborhood when he came from Birmingham, and he took us out of Dyett's band, because we could just read tremendously. Because Dyett taught us like that.

Q: Dyett also had bands that would allow his students to work out in the community, too, didn't he?

EH: Well, Woody Herman, Count Basie, Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton -- I got a chance to hear all these guys. They'd come by because they just couldn't believe the Booster Band was that hip. That was the jazz band. And when you miss a note, you're out the band. He'd pop his fingers: "You're out the band. Bring your mother up to school." And a guy in the back would take out his instrument, he'd come and sit down, and he was just as good if not better. I mean, it was that kind of competition you came up under, which really helped you. And he taught you other things about self-discipline, like do not have on polkadot socks when you have on a black suit. Heh-heh. Little things like that. Being on time, knowing the music, looking at the music to first see if it's the correct tune you're playing, then see what key signature it is. Understand where your repeats are. Little things that you should know in music.

[Music: E. Harris: "K.C. Blues," "Salute to Bird," "Hey Wado!"]

Q: The first thing Eddie Harris said to me on the phone when we were arranging this was that you had been a professional musician in Chicago for 14 years, I think you said, before "Exodus" was recorded and you were "discovered." One of these liner notes says that your first actual gig was subbing piano with the Gene Ammons band.

EH: Yeah, that was my first what you'd call paying job!

Q: Do you remember what the club was?

EH: Well, it wasn't a club. I played at the Pershing Ballroom. The next time I played it was another place, Baker's Casino. I didn't play clubs more or less with him. They had a lot of ballrooms around there, the Trianon, the Aragon on the North Side, and like that. I subbed for a guy named James Craig, who later became a policeman.

Q: He's on the very early Gene Ammons recordings, if I recollect properly.

EH: Mmm-hmm.

Q: The Pershing Ballroom was part of a hotel on 64th and Cottage that was a real center of musical life on the South Side.

EH: I played there a long time opposite Ahmad Jamal. I played there Monday and Tuesday nights, and opposite him on Friday, Saturday and Sunday.

Q: As a pianist or saxophonist?

EH: Well, I really wanted to play the saxophone, but I had Charles Stepney working with me, and Walter Perkins and Bill Lee. Then Bill Lee left to go downtown, and Walter Perkins hired a guy from Evanston to play with us -- you know him as Bob Cranshaw. So when we worked there, I played piano and Stepney played the vibes, then he doubled to go to piano and I would go to saxophone.

Q: I'd like to ask you about a few of the people that you mentioned, and some that you didn't. You talked about Sun Ra being active in Chicago He got there in the late 1940s, and did dual duty as an arranger for the Club De Lisa, which included the Fletcher Henderson band, and having his own band of young musicians out of DuSable High School, who as you mentioned, were strong readers, and doing his own music.

EH: Right.

Q: What did his music sound like in 1950 or '51 . . .

EH: Heh-heh . . .

Q: What was your reaction to playing those type of charts?

EH: I didn't have any adverse reaction to it, due to the fact that I played in the orchestras; I played classical music. The big thing was looking at the way he wrote them. It was like orchestra music. You had scales, arpeggios, flamadas and like that. He would write a note and make a zig-zag line to another note, and within that time frame you played what you wanted to play. Which is modern writing today, but I wasn't too hip to that, you know. I would have liked to stay along with him and played a lot longer, but I couldn't go along with his teachings that he had after rehearsals and after playing, when he said, "I've been here before." Because he was talking about "space is the place" and going on with that. I liked his music. I liked to experiment. But I couldn't go along with the teaching. So not being with him, that's when I more or less started playing with another group of guys, who I named earlier, where we did our thing.

Q: You mentioned drummer Ike Day, who was maybe recorded once, and the sound of the recording isn't so great. A few words about his sound. Because he made an impression on everybody who heard him.

EH: Well, what can you say about an Ike Day? Who can I say that's playing like he did? He was a combination like Max with his hands, or Philly Joe with his type of swinging. He was just a fantastic drummer. It was just unbelievable what this guy could do with just two sticks, playing on tables, on chairs.

Q: Someone told me they heard him do a solo with his toes.

EH: Well, I never witnessed that. [Laughs] But you can imagine a group of guys playing together like Dorel Anderson and Wilbur Ware, and then you'd have a guy like Ike Day sit in and play the drums. Dorel played drums . . . I mean, it was just extremely talented guys in that immediate area of Chicago, which was primarily the South Side. And I couldn't understand why they weren't recorded more, because it was right there. I mean, even though they had little mishaps of drugs and like that, but so did a lot of other people that were recorded!

Q: A lot of people also came through Chicago from other places. For example, Sonny Rollins a couple of times set up shop in Chicago, so to speak.

EH: Sonny Rollins worked there at a day job. In fact, they hired him, "they" meaning Max Roach-Clifford Brown. Clifford had brought me to the band to play at the Beehive, and he felt I was quite a player, that I could read the parts, I could play . . . But Max felt my tone was kind of funny.

Q: In some interviews you've talked about your tone. And I think in the interview for the liner notes of Artists Choice [Rhino] you said that you ran into Don Ellis in the Army, and he said that your tone was too light or something. Talk a bit about how you formulated a saxophone style.

EH: Well, the whole point of guys who were more or less envious and guys who were trying to bag on me, trying to bring down my arrogance and egotisticalness . . . Because you have to have this in order to play. You don't have to be dogmatic about it, but you have to believe in yourself. And they'd say, "Oh man . . . " This is prejudice times, now; this is the late '40s or the early '50s . . . the late '40s primarily . . . "Oh, man, you sound like Stan Getz," and that's supposed to have been a putdown. I even had caucasian guys telling me that, because I played in caucasian bands. And they didn't realize that really Getz was playing like Lester Young before he lost his teeth. Because if you listen to his old sound, "Taxi War Dance," Prez and Hershel Evans, he played like that, with a lighter sound. As a matter of fact, any saxophone player that's trying to play fast or trying to play skips or high notes, he or she becomes a lighter player, because you cannot play heavy and play rapido. But that's neither here nor there.

Anyway, they put me down. "Oh, man, you sound like Getz." So I had to live with that. Then finally, I started challenging the guys back because I just got fed up with it. "Oh man, but you know, you did sound like . . . " See, they wasn't listening to what I'm playing. People are just hung up in sounds. That's even today, a person's sound. They say, "Oh yeah, he sounds like Trane." But what is he playing? Yeah, but as long as I get that sound, I'm automatically in. But not in as far as I'm concerned. But so many people just go by the sound.

See, I was trying to play higher notes, I was trying to play skips like that. But I was using that timbre of sound, which was really the Lester Young school as opposed to the Chu Berry or the Coleman Hawkins way, and to use that and make articulate playing, utilization of tonguing at least every other note, which I get a brass effect. And quiet as it's kept, only one guy ever told me, he said, "I see, you're trying to play like a trumpet on saxophone." That was the late Pepper Adams, who was playing on a big band. He said, "Man, you're the first cat that really peeped that I was trying to do that. Now, you see, I can play five C's now, and you see I can hit high notes, and I do a lot of phrasing -- I hit things like Miles and Clifford and them on the saxophone.

Q: And subsequently, of course, you used different mouthpieces, trumpet mouthpieces on the saxophone, or saxophone mouthpieces on the trumpet . . .

EH: Well, I was doing that to get different sounds. I was always trying different sounds. The only reason why I more or less put that on the back- burner was electric came out; then I started dealing with electric.

Q: Your relationship with Muhal Richard Abrams goes back to high school. In 1960 or 1961, you and Muhal organized a workshop band that got together briefly, then subsequently you parted ways. This band was the core of what became the AACM. What events, as you recollect it, inspired its formation?

EH: It was a thing that trying to play around Chicago, you figured there are guys that never played first chair, there are guys that never played on a big band, and there are other guys that never had an opportunity to write for a large number of people, and there are people that wanted to sing, and sing in front of a band -- "so let's form a workshop." There were three of us. There was the late Johnny Hines, a trumpeter from the West Side of Chicago, and Muhal Richard Abrams and myself. And we just got this together at the C&C, which was a lounge, a large lounge. And the musicians . . . It was surprising that so many musicians came! I mean, it was just amazing. I think we must have had about 100 musicians.

But then you have this class set of the musicians who were more or less our age or older, who were astute musicians, then you had the younger musicians -- and the astute musicians were like, "Oh, I don't want to play with these guys, they're just learning." So a guy like myself, I'll take a few charts and pass it out to the guys, and put guys in precarious positions. Like a guy I know that can play a good first, I'll give him a third part. Now he's got to play lower. [Laughs] Then you stomp off kind of rapid, and the guys would be missing notes, and then make the younger kids say, "Damn, they can miss notes, too!" And the guys would be all uptight who can really play. Then that deflates their ego some. Then we can get on with the workshop.

Lo and behold, it was going pretty good. But I had to travel, because I had this hit record, "Exodus." But I don't know what happened; when I came back there were divisions. Johnny Hines tried to take the musicians more our age; he wanted to go into the Regal Theatre so he could have a band to really accompany all the stars that come in there. Muhal had taken the younger musicians and let them learn in reading on scales and playing with each other. So that's how that came about. And Muhal eventually got together with the Association . . .

Q: They chartered in 1965 and set up that whole . . . .

EH: Yes, they set it up. But that's how that came about.

Q: Let's hear an extended piece, I guess collectively worked out by the band from maybe around 1970 or '71. This comes from Excursions, a double LP issued on Atlantic in 1973. The track is "Turbulence," featuring Eddie Harris on electric saxophone and reed trumpet; Ronald Muldrow on guitorgan . . . ?

EH: That's right, guitorgan. That was a guitar with pickups under the fret- board to make it sound like an organ.

Q: Muhal Richard Abrams on piano. Rufus Reid, who was living in Chicago in that period, around the cusp of 1970, on bass, and Billy James on drums.

EH: That was a working band.

Q: And you played all over, in many different situations.

EH: All over these United States.

[Music: "Turbulence"; E. Harris/E. Marsalis, "Deacceleration"]

Q: How did this duo album you made with Ellis Marsalis come about?

EH: Ellis and I have played together numerous times down in New Orleans where he lives, so I come down there and I play with him. On other occasions I've come down and played with different groups. And this guy I played with several times named Dave Torkanowsky, he had studied with Ellis, and he really enjoyed playing with me. He had an opportunity to produce a record, and he said he thought it would be great if Ellis and I would do a duo. He called me up and had me fly down to Dallas, and we did it on the spur of the moment -- no rehearsals, nothing.

Q: Let's talk about the scene in Chicago as it developed in the 1960s.

EH: There were a lot of guys playing good music around there in the '60s. There was Gene Shaw who played trumpet, who passed later on. Then of course, there was the guy who had a group called the Pharaohs, which you'd know later on as the Phoenix Horns.

Q: I'm under the impression, though, that the club scene kind of declined and there were a lot fewer opportunities to work around Chicago then -- although maybe you didn't directly experience that.

EH: Well, the club scene was beginning to decline because television was on the rise, and as more television, people were staying at home looking at more of the wrestling matches and roller derby.

Q: You mentioned in an interview that you spent a good amount of time in New York and were working a lot, but you chose to come back to Chicago.

EH: I came here, and immediately, coming up out of the subway . . . After I checked into the hotel, I went and rode on the subway up to Harlem, and I walked up, and I'm looking at the tall buildings of Harlem, because I thought maybe they might be a little smaller in Harlem, because it was residential -- that's what I thought my first time here, in the '50s. And what happened? I ran into the trumpet man. "Dag," he says, "you're lost. Oh man! What are you doing here?! Hey, man, come and play with my band." I said, "Really? "Yeah," he said. "If you're in town here, you can come and play with me." That was . . . I'm getting bad on names, man. Because see, you're going back in time on me. He wrote this tune, [Sings the first few bars of "Blue Bossa"].

Q: Oh, that's K.D. you're talking about.

EH: Yeah, Kenny Dorham. And I went and played with him, and I walked around town here, and all the guys would hire me, because I played piano, I could play trombone, read, you know. And I can play clarinet, the oboe, bassoon. My flute playing is sad. It's still sad, because I don't think that is a double. Of course, I have several flutes at home, and I can make it through an amateur part, but I don't care to play it. But I worked nine nights a week. I worked afternoons playing piano for some people tap-dancing, and I could play in pit bands. But I never had any money! I was living with Cedar Walton and Sam Fletcher, the vocalist, and I said, "Hey, man, I'm going back to Chicago." They said, "Man, you're crazy. Guys don't come here and work like you."

I just went back to Chicago. And what happened? That's how I made "Exodus". I was scheduled to go back to Europe and play, because Quincy Jones was going to hire me to take a guy's place named Oliver Nelson, and he had me to play with him when I was over in Europe with his band. He said, "Man, I'm happy to run into you. You can go back to Europe with me." I said, "Okay."

I stopped by to see my mother, and she asked me what was I doing, and she said, "I'm going back over to Europe with a guy named Quincy Jones." She started crying. She just made a big issue out of this. I said, "What's wrong? What's wrong?" She said, "I understood you was going to make a record." I said, "Oh yeah, I can do that when I come back." She said, "It's a shame. I'm ashamed to tell people that you play music. Because everybody's made a record but you." I said, "I don't care nothin' about that. I'm working. I'm playing." She said, "Well, you ought to make this one record, because VeeJay asked you to make a record."

But they'd asked me to record on piano, because they wanted me to sound like the guy down the street at Cadet Records which I used to show chords to.

Q: Not Ahmad Jamal!

EH: No, Ramsey Lewis. [Laughs] Yeah, Ahmad was down there. Of course, he's an outstanding piano player. But this guy had the Gentlemen of Jazz, this Ramsey Lewis, and that was selling. So they wanted me to do that down the street at Vee-Jay. And I wasn't particular about that, so I didn't care nothing about making a record. But my mother said, "Oh, please make this one record, then you can go to Europe, Asia, anywhere." I said, "But won't nobody want me then if I stay here and make the record."

So I went down to Chess, and I talked with them, and they said, "Well, we don't want you to play the saxophone; you're too weird." And I told him where to go. Well, there was a guy named Sid McCoy, and a guy named Abner, who ran the company . . . It was actually Vivian and Jimmy's company, V-J, and Abner was the president, and Sid McCoy was the a&r, artists and repertoire guy. Abner, who had gone down there to college with me, said, "I'll tell you what. I'll let you play several numbers on saxophone." I said, "Okay, that's fair enough." I told Quincy that. He said, "One record?! Oh, man." And to this day, when he thinks about it, he says, "One record" -- because that one record turned out to be "Exodus." Isn't that amazing? A million-seller.

[Music: "Love For Sale" (1965); "Harlem Nocturne" (1990); "God Bless The Child" (1959)]

Q: Eddie Harris said they used that version of "God Bless The Child" for a TV story of Lady Day's life.

EH: Yes, yes. It was great. Billie Holiday was very instrumental in trying to get me to understand that I could not only swing, that I played melodically. I was playing at the Pershing Lounge opposite Ahmad Jamal, and played the off-nights. She had a club underneath, which at first she called Birdland, then the people in New York here wouldn't allow her to call it Birdland, so she changed it to Budland.

She came down one time, when we were rehearsing during the afternoon . . . She came down to all these rehearsals, any time she could, and she directed the rehearsals. "Hey, don't do that?" "Why don't you leave me alone?" And she said, "You can really phrase. Your timing . . . " -- and she used a lot of four-letter words that I won't use over the radio!

But the point is that she encouraged me . . . Because I'm basically a quiet guy, standing back, and all the guys, it seemed like they were hipper than me playing the horn because of the fact they played the Charlie Parker licks, the Sonny Rollins licks . . . well, whoever, you can play the Rabbit [Johnny Hodges] licks . . . And here I could read all these things and play, but when I go to play, I played more phrasing melodically. Of course, you had Gene Ammons around there who played melodically, but he wasn't tackling the type of tunes we were tackling. We were trying to play like these other guys, but then trying to solo differently than the other guys. In other words, you play a Charlie Parker line, but if you take off on your solo you didn't try to be Bud, or the bass player didn't try to be Mingus, and the drummer wasn't trying to be Max.

So she was telling me I should continue phrasing the way I was. I'll tell you something, Ted. I'm saying this primarily for younger musicians out there, or people who might have kids that play. Sometimes you can do something that comes very easy to you, and you don't think very much of it due to the fact that it comes easy to you. As a kid I could always play, and the house would swing, pat their feet. I mean, I didn't need a rhythm section. I really didn't. I could just hit a groove, and people would automatically . . .

But most of my colleagues couldn't. So I was trying to play like them, playing off-meter, double-time, like that. And she was trying to explain to me, "Just play what you play, and people will just go berserk." But I wasn't looking at that, because you have your peers. The majority of the guys double up, run over the instrument, look like they can play faster than you. But they really couldn't when we stomped off something fast. I could play fast, but I play in meter.

Q: When you play something like that, it almost has the quality of singing, and you said you were singing at a very, very young age.

EH: Oh, yes. But you don't realize what you have, because you're just swamped up by others. Because see, most musicians do not and cannot play in meter. And I didn't realize this until later years. And I mean "in meter," just have a guy play by himself, and he's not playing one note, [sings one note sequence], but just trying to play -- and you'll see how his time fluctuates. In other words, a lot of people swing when they're with swinging people, but are they swinging themselves on the instrument? In other words, you hear a guy phrasing, you can imagine if you were at the control room where you can douse the board and take the rhythm section out and hear this guy play. I mean, it's nice. He's making the changes, he's making the modulations. But why did you stop patting your foot? Because he has no more support from the rhythm. Because he's not carrying the rhythm himself -- or herself nowadays.

This next piece is currently the way I'm playing, trio piano in Europe. I've just come back from 36 one-nighters, and playing piano with the bassist, who is Ray Peterson, and the drummer, Norman Fearington.

Q: This is the current working band?

EH: It's the working band, yes. Ray Peterson is playing with Les and me down there. Of course, Norman had to go to Europe, so we have Ben Riley in place of Norman.

[Music: "Ambidextrous," "Airegin" (solo sax)]

Q: We've heard you establish yourself as a player very much out of the esthetic of the period you came from, Lester Young, Charlie Parker, Stan Getz, and that end of it, as a rabid experimentalist, dealing with every type of imaginable sound, and always within a very functional situation. It's amazing that you're able to play with the reed trumpet or the clarinet with no neck in front of some very tough audiences and make it come off. And we've heard the high standard of virtuosic saxophone playing, some great piano playing, and some singing. We haven't heard "Why Are You So Overweight," but I guess we could do that, too.

EH: If you ever get a chance one of these days, try listening to "Oleo" on Excursions, and you will hear me play the saxophone with the trombone mouthpiece, which makes it sound like a valve trombone.

Q: I'll do that. But just a word about your piano playing, which we've touched on. We've heard two examples now, one where you play "Our Love Is Here To Stay" in a very expansive, Tatumesque, Nat Cole type of style.

EH: Mmm-hmm.

Q: On the last you were playing a Chicago left-hand boogie-woogie . . . Piano was your first instrument, I take it.

EH: Yes.

Q: A few words about your relationship with the piano.

EH: Well, I was taught by my cousin when I was a very young age, at four, and then I came up playing in the church, and I played and studied piano at Roosevelt College, where I had an awful time.

Q: Why was that?

EH: Because they wanted me to go to Piano 104, not beginning piano. I was taught in a church, and I was slow reading, and I had incorrect fingering -- and I wanted to just learn the piano when I was going to college there. They said, "No, you're not going to take this credit, because you play too well." And they put me in a class with people running over piano, reading things -- [sings fast, dense passage]. They was gone! And I stayed in there for quite a while, because I could listen to people play and I could sit down and play it. That doesn't mean I could read it that fast, but I was telling them I wanted to learn it. I had an awful time trying to convince people that I was really trying to learn piano in the correct way. But no, they said, "You play too well." So consequently, I didn't go take private lessons . . . I didn't care about the piano anyway. I just was doing that while I was in college. And lo and behold, I've made more money playing piano, working, than I have saxophone. It's amazing.

Q: A lot of your early gigs were piano gigs.

EH: Yeah. Even recently, out in California, I started a club, and I played solo piano, then it wound up a duo and a trio -- and now it's one of the top jazz places.

Q: What club is that?

EH: That's Bel Age. It's a hotel, the Brasserie. One time I was here in New York, and I stopped on 23rd Street in a restaurant to get something to eat, and they had a piano there. I said, "Hey, can I play some while I'm waiting for the food?" The guy said, "Yeah, if you can play, man. Don't be messing with the piano if you can't play." I said, "I can play." I sat down there and played. And this guy offered me a gig! He says, "Oh, man, I like your feeling, the way you played, you know tunes . . . " I said, "I wish this was where I lived. I live in Los Angeles." He said, "Really? Well, come on up here and live!"

It's strange. People like my piano playing. I wish they would like my saxophone playing like that. I don't know what it is. The piano playing, maybe it's because I can groove, I get across to the average John and Jane Doe. The saxophone, I don't know what it is. I've never had that happen.

Q: The saxophone seems to me almost a laboratory for you, like you're always looking for some new effect or new way to get something over so as maybe not to get bored . . .

EH: Maybe that's it. Because at the piano, I just don't care. I just play, I make a run, when I run out of fingers I cross my hand over and I hit it with the back of my hand!


C o m m e n t s

Eddie Harris's sound 1 of 5
barry levine December 16, 03

Nice interview. I was hoping to find out a little about his great upper register sound on tenor (smooth and sweet like an alto sax) - did he use an alto mouthpiece? Unfortunately, not answered in this interview. What a great player.

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